Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
October 16, 2018, 04:18:55 AM

BIRTH OF A BUGGY CONTINUED

This is a discussion for the topic BIRTH OF A BUGGY CONTINUED on the board Members Buggies.

Author Topic: BIRTH OF A BUGGY CONTINUED  (Read 23180 times)

this user is offline snoopy

  • MBC Moderator
  • Buggy Fanatic
  • ******
  • Posts: 7189
  • evesham. 07757010432
  • Kango ss/ Jas lwb
Reply #210 on: February 12, 2018, 05:08:08 PM
You are correct big seal fits across bonnet thinner one is visible across the dash although a different shaped top to most buggies as they fit into a channel under the bottom rail rather than have the bottom rail sitting in it.


this user is offline Paul1953

  • Buggy Meister
  • **
  • Posts: 1214
  • Newton Aycliffe, Co Durham
  • MANX SWB
Reply #211 on: February 13, 2018, 08:21:31 AM
Thanks Keith ... P.


this user is offline Manxdavid

  • Forum Moderator
  • Buggy Queen
  • ******
  • Posts: 4071
  • LL68, Anglesey, North Wales.
  • Meyers Manx UK-00-002
Reply #212 on: February 13, 2018, 09:49:40 AM
The bottom rubber was designed for early Manxes where the dash was set inside the bonnet rather than flush like on later ones with the dash moulded to the bonnet. I usually end up trimming 1/4 inch off the rear flap with a Stanley knife.
Photos printed on genuine ILFORDŽ paper.


this user is offline Keithmanx

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 98
  • Thatcham, Berkshire
  • Manx
Reply #213 on: February 13, 2018, 12:39:00 PM
The bottom rubber was designed for early Manxes where the dash was set inside the bonnet rather than flush like on later ones with the dash moulded to the bonnet. I usually end up trimming 1/4 inch off the rear flap with a Stanley knife.

Yes, had to do this on both of mine


this user is offline Paul1953

  • Buggy Meister
  • **
  • Posts: 1214
  • Newton Aycliffe, Co Durham
  • MANX SWB
Reply #214 on: February 13, 2018, 02:42:12 PM
Thanks for this  ;-)up ;-)up


this user is offline Paul1953

  • Buggy Meister
  • **
  • Posts: 1214
  • Newton Aycliffe, Co Durham
  • MANX SWB
Reply #215 on: April 22, 2018, 04:27:40 PM
Tank fitted into position,,,,   Breather pipe attached and supported...  Wire from tank sender has to secured such that it will not "rattle" about and chaffe against anything.






All fuel lines have to meet EU standard. (Photograph the pipe).






this user is offline Paul1953

  • Buggy Meister
  • **
  • Posts: 1214
  • Newton Aycliffe, Co Durham
  • MANX SWB
Reply #216 on: April 23, 2018, 04:19:50 PM
Drain valve in place. Will need to find a means of securing closed. Wired probably




this user is offline Paul1953

  • Buggy Meister
  • **
  • Posts: 1214
  • Newton Aycliffe, Co Durham
  • MANX SWB
Reply #217 on: April 23, 2018, 04:32:47 PM
Bonnet secured.  Fuel filler in place. (Cap hinged and does not come fully off so securing wire not required).

Headlights and indicators in place.  (Hoping the original style indicator bulb is duplicated in led and forgot to check if available are they acceptable for MOT\IVA etc. Filament style bulb has to be of correct colour orange  a la EU regs).





Windscreen fitted.... (Not at all impressed with the seal that fits under screen bottom rail... It fits only where it touches at best. Needs a bit of fettling... don`t expect a "out of he box fix" )


A shot of the  the stainless shield plate fitted on the inner face of the front bulkhead. (Not required by all test sites but is at some).
The cutout at the top is for access to the fuel filler neck clamping bolt.





this user is offline parmaynu

  • Buggy Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 2040
  • Maidstone, Kent
  • Nuffin
    • Old Skool Parts Shop
Reply #218 on: April 23, 2018, 05:11:27 PM
That stainless panel looks great. Did you make it yourself?
Old Skool Parts Shop

oldskoolpartsshop.com


this user is offline Paul1953

  • Buggy Meister
  • **
  • Posts: 1214
  • Newton Aycliffe, Co Durham
  • MANX SWB
Reply #219 on: April 24, 2018, 07:50:32 AM
Hi Mathew... No I obtained this from Mark at Flatlands.   Simply because he alerted me to the fact he needed one when he first went through the IVA route. (He does not have them listed on his website). When I checked with my local station they advised fitting something similar although I do now know it`s not every station that requires one. It`s certainly not in the guide manual. The panel you see in the photo is fitted temporary and will be coming off again. I wanted to see where it lay in relation to where the column would be and of course I will be fitting the column hole cover unit you sent me.

Laser cutting is an ideal method of shaping stainless panels etc but it`s not something I have access to at home. I have cut quite a few odd shaped "washers" brackets etc from stainless sheet using a 1mm cutting disc but you go through discs like there was no tomorrow on long runs and you do need to keep your eyes protected from the bits of stainless and carborundum fragments.

When I remove this again would it be of any use if I drew a "template" on wallpaper so you had the dimensions. (Bearing in mind this one is "Manx" biased shape wise)?


this user is offline Manxdavid

  • Forum Moderator
  • Buggy Queen
  • ******
  • Posts: 4071
  • LL68, Anglesey, North Wales.
  • Meyers Manx UK-00-002
Reply #220 on: April 24, 2018, 08:32:31 AM
I've always meant to make one, maybe from marine plywood or tough plastic sheet. Maybe next time I take the bonnet off for something I'll have a go. ;-)up
Photos printed on genuine ILFORDŽ paper.


this user is offline Keithmanx

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 98
  • Thatcham, Berkshire
  • Manx
Reply #221 on: April 24, 2018, 12:38:14 PM
That's coming on nicely Paul  ;-)up


this user is offline Paul1953

  • Buggy Meister
  • **
  • Posts: 1214
  • Newton Aycliffe, Co Durham
  • MANX SWB
Reply #222 on: April 25, 2018, 07:59:09 AM
Cheers Keith.... It`s surprising how a little appreciation goes a long way in keeping build spirits up. I will, very soon, be tackling what has been the most thought through aspect of this build but only in theory so far. I have given myself an enormous task by deciding to fit a triangulated roll hoop, standard seat belts and the associated mounting points. Stress plates are a new subject to me and even with advice it is proving to be very subjective.

It will come down to one thing in the end... the view of the examiner as to the appropriateness of my interpretation of advice. Basic IVA does not require proof of destructive testing. It all comes down to the examiners view of "what he sees" as being appropriate or not.  (Any one out there remember "moments of force" theory... I certainly don`t).

Wish me luck   ;D ;D


this user is offline parmaynu

  • Buggy Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 2040
  • Maidstone, Kent
  • Nuffin
    • Old Skool Parts Shop
Reply #223 on: April 25, 2018, 09:30:58 AM
Very keen to see you seat belt plans. While my chassis is apart I should really fit mounts to the inside of the tunnel. Just not sure where to locate them.

Keep up the good work Paul!
Old Skool Parts Shop

oldskoolpartsshop.com


this user is offline Paul1953

  • Buggy Meister
  • **
  • Posts: 1214
  • Newton Aycliffe, Co Durham
  • MANX SWB
Reply #224 on: April 28, 2018, 03:56:18 PM
Fitted both stub axles to the torsion arms. Nice to note their is no distortion etc of the front end , torsion arms and stub axle assemblies.
Have to say, having stripped this king\link pin assembly down and rebuilt it I have seen far worse and these are quite good considering.

The stub axles must be the most mis-used parts of any Beetle etc bar non. The spacers on mine, (Bits the inner wheel bearing and grease seal fits to ), have been "savaged" at some time in the past, For whatever reason they have been removed they both have been belted to high heavens with a hammer, Heated up to high temperature and I will probably replace both.

Am going to preach a bit here... Above all treat stub axles with the utmost care. Never Ever belt the threaded end with a hammer. If you need to hit them , do it gently with a block of wood between the stub axle end and your hammer. Make sure both nuts are on thier threads first anyway, or the one piece clamping nut... whichever you have. This way you can unscrew the nut when finished with the tapping.

Remenber... one side is a left handed thread... the other is a right handed thread. (If you have managed to remove a stubborn nut always check what is going on before using any force to screw back on. If the nut becomes tight check out why. Make sure you don`t cross the threads or you are up the creak without a paddle.

Should you need to remove the spacer at the back of the inner bearing only use a puller that will sit in the spacer groove. That`s what a puller is for.... to make your life simple. This part of the stub axle is not tapered so the spacer should come off without too much difficuly.

Repo spacers... Available but I have noticed two styles in the seller photographs,. One photo shows as original with the all important outer groove. The other, cheaper version is minus the groove. (No problem I guess if you are never likely to want it of the stub axle again).

Right... hope you have taken notice because new standard stub axles with their carriers do not seem to be available in the UK unless you opt for "dropped" spindle type.

If you have changed out the link pin bushes, pin, link pin bushes and re-assembled things the stub axle should rotate freely without and up down slop or front to back\side to side rock. Often one side will appear to move more freely than the other but their should be no inherrent stiffness needing force to rotate the stub axle.

The link pins should slide through their bushes freely and through the eyes of the torsion arms freely without slop or rock. Make sure the torsion arm eyes are clean and free of rust, muck, old grease or paint. (You may need to use a cold chisel or similar to "open up" the eye slot but don`t wallop too hard).

Make sure the link pin head can sit in the circular carrier and rotate freely. The two "eyes" on each carrier will be the most neglected parts of the carrier as the carrier will have been held in a vice more than once.

Important.... check VIN number and check number against the shimming list. Some have 8 shims per link pin. Some 10 shims. (Don`t take for granted what you take out is correct). Use straight edge held squarely on the bottom torsion arm eye. Measure the gap between the straight edge and the upper torsion arm eye. This is the "offset". Look your offset figure up on the shimming list and it will tell you how many shims each side of each link pin.  Most of the buggies about should also have the small "o" ring and "o" ring cover fitted which sits on the inner side along the link pin. (see photo)
With everything in place on the link pins offer the carrier to the top torsion arm eye and insert the link pin just enough to keep the assembly in place.  Use a jack under the bottom torsion arm and raise the arm gently until it is position for the lower link pin to go into the eye. Pull the carrier away from the top eye and approach both top and bottom arms with the top and bottom link pins parallel and the pins will slide straight in.

Note you have probably jacked up the lower arm obscuring the hole where the "adjusting bolt comes through. No problem with both link pins fully home in the torsion arms lower the jack gently. Both link pins will still rotate easily so you can slot the bolts in.

Link pin adjustment.... Very simple but do it regularly..... Each one... with bolt in place but nut not tightened fully rotate the squared end of the link pin to pull the link pin fully home. When tight back of the link pin only fractionally and tighten the pinch bolt fully. Adjust at least once a year and squeeze in a bit of grease. (Nipple top and bottom).




Check link pin can fit right in recess and still rotate freely. These are the edges suffering damage from vice and hammering over the years. Clean up the circular edges if the pin won`t sit in and rotate. The slightest catch and the pin will grab up. Emery or Dremel does a good job.. just keep the bits out of the assembly with a rag.






Here is the damaged spacer. It was clear as well as the battering someone had had a large stilsons on it. The was the worst of the two