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February 27, 2021, 06:30:54 AM

BIRTH OF A BUGGY CONTINUED

This is a discussion for the topic BIRTH OF A BUGGY CONTINUED on the board Members Buggies.

Author Topic: BIRTH OF A BUGGY CONTINUED  (Read 60030 times)

this user is offline Paul1953

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on: October 10, 2016, 10:28:01 AM
There we are shell off the chassis.  The shell does come down as neatly as you see in the photo. The floor pans don`t look too bad in the photo but both sides completely shot as were the out ends of the back support sections. On the plus side the admiral`s hat was sound. Time for a cuppa.  ;-)(-;

« Last Edit: July 14, 2017, 01:32:03 PM by Paul1953 »


this user is offline Paul1953

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Reply #1 on: October 10, 2016, 12:43:22 PM
 Shell out of the way. lot of heartache over that. From the rot up-over the shell was one of the most sound I have come across. See door bottoms etc. Glass surrounds totally rot free. Rear seat base area 100% sound. Inner wings sound as the day they left the factory except for the lowest bolt retainer on forward and rearward location. rear bumper hanger area solid except for the lower bolt retainers. Had to go though due to lack of space to store and it would have needed a bit of time spent replacing rain gutters etc. Wife would have gone spare at yet another "wreck", (her words), on the drive. I have only a very small domestic garage and a shed cum workshop so space for all the bits and pieces are really at a premium. Floor pans.. Well I knew I had a problem when I was driving it onto my drive from the car transporter. Accelerator pedal and my foot went straight through the floor as soon as I pressed  it. Back to that oldie fix. A piece of string attached to the carb and the other end in my left hand. I am not an engineer just a guy who passed his driving test at the age of 17 back in 1970. My first job with a take home pay of 9 quid. Gave my mam 9 and kept 4. Managed to buy my first car, a bug, for 50 quid. No MOT and no hydraulic brakes. Drove it home using the handbrake. Lack of cash meant that I had to find a way of getting it on the road myself. Went on to have another 12 beetles, none of which I paid more than 50 for. Just trying to say that my methods are simply what I found worked for me and I will share as I go along. I`m not the most methodical bloke either so I will be posting things that might seem a bit disjointed. Bear with me and I will cover everything as I go along. I have done it again and not taken my own advice. AS YOU DISMANTLE THINGS TAKE A MILLION PHOTOS. BAG AND LABEL EVERY LITTLE BIT. It will save you hours of time. Here is a photo of one of the most boring bits... 2nd most boring anyway. Drilling of spot welds with a spot weld drill.. I prefer this method to that of an air chisel. If you choose this option take your time. Make sure to centre the pilot bit as best as possible. The original spot welds were done by hand and often the operator would not get the weld in the middle of the flange so he would have a second go and maybe a third. Here try to get part of two welds with the bit then again with the third . Bore through the floor pan sheet and stop as soon as poss` after that. Try not to drill too deep. You will at first if new to this but don`t worry cos you will be welding back up later and will fill things. You can drill without going right through and use a slender flat chisel to sever the last bit if you prefer. There are a lot of spot welds and most likely you will wear out the first rotary cutter so buy the pack with three included. They are not expensive. 
« Last Edit: July 14, 2017, 01:39:19 PM by Paul1953 »


this user is offline Paul1953

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Reply #2 on: October 10, 2016, 02:02:02 PM
Another photo that shows the rotten ends of the cross members. Also this picture is where I used the sabre saw to remove most of the floor pan halves before using spot weld drill. Makes access much easier.

« Last Edit: July 14, 2017, 01:45:56 PM by Paul1953 »


this user is offline Dave DND

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Reply #3 on: October 10, 2016, 02:19:47 PM
Taxed worse   ;-)up

Looking forward to this build thread - good pictures and descriptions  ;)
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this user is offline Peter

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Reply #4 on: October 10, 2016, 02:57:57 PM
So am I, this stuff takes time, years, and I remember all the ups and down's very well, use your imagination
as it's amazing what you can do and improve on the stuff you have, dont cut corner's but take time
and be patient, as believe me it's worth it in the end.

I am certain a very nice bug will be unfolding here  ;-)up

Peter
'We desperately need to bring nature and green, back into contact with people'


this user is offline parmaynu

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Reply #5 on: October 11, 2016, 09:07:51 AM
I love a detailed build thread!
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this user is offline Paul1953

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Reply #6 on: October 11, 2016, 10:23:40 AM
Thanks guys  :)  Floor pans off here. 1 more job to do before I shove it into my garage for the first time. (That is removal of the tarred material from the tunnel. Go slowly for this, use a scraper and heat gun. Not too hot and it will peel\scrape away. Bit of a shame to take it off cos the paint is shiny black underneath). The "trolley" is a home made wooden thing with castors built to allow me to work at a height that doesn`t have my back screaming after ten minutes of bending. Young in the head, ha ha, but knackered in body. The castors allow easy pushing pulling in and out of garage. I don`t have access to bead blaster so many hundreds of hours followed after this photo with wire wheels, flap disks etc to get the rust and crap off a multitude of items. Something I have come to believe in after ordering reproduction parts is that I understand without reproduction parts we would not have many old vehicles on the road again so not knocking them but they are built to a price rather than to original standards. Original bolts, etc even after 50 years clean up well and even  after all this time are way superior in my opinion to modern steel stuff. I opted to buy this bug because of a number of reasons. It is swing arm rear, bullet proof in my opinion for the type of driving I will be doing. Done the flying over dunes stuff. Alright until the novelty wears off but your backside etc will shout. The frame head was a clincher. Surface rust nothing more. Much more sturdy that repo` part. Problem was it has king\link pin front end. Again a bullet proof system that should last a lifetime when greased & adjusted regularly. These one`s aren`t so new bushes and pins. King pin bush replacement isn`t difficult. A large vice, an adjustable reamer and a steady arm & eye and you are there. I will deal with this separately cos you can do this at home. I have many times. Will be swapping to disc brakes. IVA states "Friction material" will "self adjust" hence discs, no exception to this. (Restrictors required as IVA then states, "Front brakes will not lock up before rears". Again will cover this in detail

« Last Edit: July 17, 2017, 10:50:54 AM by Paul1953 »


this user is offline Peter

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Reply #7 on: October 11, 2016, 11:48:22 AM
 ;-)up

Seems a long time ago, but I had a helper with that and everything else,
every step of the way and what great job he did!  ;-)up  :)

Peter

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this user is offline Paul1953

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Reply #8 on: October 11, 2016, 01:33:38 PM
I used to have one of those Pete but he grew up and moved out   Have a 6 year old grandson who loves  nuts, bolts and spanners but I have to be careful to watch out his mam is not around cos she thinks he is still a baby and will hurt himself  ;-)up


this user is offline Paul1953

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Reply #9 on: October 12, 2016, 09:37:27 AM
Just a quick word for any of you contemplating IVA compliance before I move on through the build. I travelled to Norfolk to meet up with Mark at Flatlands so that I knew who and what I would be dealing with. Mark couldn`t be a more friendly, helpful guy. My first verbal queries regarding compliance was with Mark and I began to understand the mind set of VOSA and their ways as I found very similar reactions from my local station. I too was given the mobile phone number of a tester at my local station and this guy was super friendly and encouraged long conversations on any aspect you wished to discuss. This guy gives me clear, full details, of what is needed and if you ring him and he is busy he rings straight back as soon as he could. I think this response was simply as enthusiastic as it was because I had used that term "beach buggy".  ;-)up . So.... help is out there. Try to think of what you need for compliance as you go along and attend to it bit by bit. Time to introduce you young lads out there to a tool from back in the mists of time that can be made up from scrap you will find in most garages\sheds and it will ensure your chopped pan halves line up perfectly in the side to side plane when you bring them together. It`s called a "Go-No-Go" gauge.


this user is offline snoopy

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Reply #10 on: October 12, 2016, 01:02:10 PM
Good comments about the testers there Paul the same sort of reply I have heard abouttesters at other sites, guess they are also petrol heads to do the job in the first place not anti car greens who would enforce the regulations to the book. Common sense and mechanical knowledge is applied to allow slight variation.


this user is offline railking

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Reply #11 on: October 12, 2016, 02:21:56 PM
I will be  following this thread with interest, I will be starting my buggy build next year and as someone with little or no experience of working on dubs, your hints and tips and tips about tools/ iva will be invaliable ;-)up.



this user is offline Paul1953

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Reply #12 on: October 12, 2016, 03:16:21 PM
;-)up Please do.. When you start just ask anything at all. I currently have a lot of disjointed bits and pieces that are being or have been modified for IVA. These I will post as I go along. Hopefully at the end of things for me, and having eventually acquired IVA compliance, I will summarise everything taking into account of what I had done and what was needed after the 1st visit as I cannot imagine I would get through the IVA test 1st time.


this user is offline Paul1953

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Reply #13 on: October 12, 2016, 03:33:39 PM
Next bit... I spent a bit of time wondering if I should replace the floor pans before sectioning the chassis or after. I decided to replace them first so I could take a look see at where I would mark out the chevron section to remove. For a Manx 14,1\2" is the recommended amount to take out. (I have just seen the other method on another recent post here. This method uses a more complex series of cuts but from the photo`s it looks to be an improvement upon the chevron method in that the two halves seem to come together better). More on this later.  Once you have the tunnel ready to take the new floor pans clean up the tunnel flange. Use a drill bit of similar diameter to the spot weld drill and go around the inner perimeter of the new pans drilling holes about 1" apart. A lot of drilling but this was the distance between welds that was advised along with full weld where the out end of the floor pan meets the admirals hat. IVA check of welding is... of adequate standard for purpose and check for full penetration. I have opted to leave the "spot welds" as they were upon completion and not grind them flush to the floor pan so that the tester can take a good look. Something I did not check... IVA requirement for Seat Adjustment... Must be a DUAL LEVER ACTION SLIDE... no exception so the standard Beetle runners cannot be retained. Cut them off the floor pans before you weld the pans in place. Much easier than when the pans in place. (The photo shows the pan in place with the runner still in-situ). (I call these spot welds but obviously they are not. I don`t know if there is a standard name but they are just repeated local welds by MIG.

« Last Edit: July 17, 2017, 10:54:36 AM by Paul1953 »


this user is offline snoopy

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Reply #14 on: October 12, 2016, 04:32:38 PM
An aquanintance shortend pans to fit a gp tub but spent hours on the measuring, cuts and fitment but all the pressings in the pan lined up after as did the fitment around the rear curves of the tunnel..