Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
April 12, 2021, 06:54:29 PM

Bounty Hunter Windscreen

This is a discussion for the topic Bounty Hunter Windscreen on the board Beach Buggy General Help.

Author Topic: Bounty Hunter Windscreen  (Read 208 times)

this user is offline Bealzebug01

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 49
  • Lichfield, Staffs
  • Prowler
on: April 07, 2021, 05:40:48 PM
Hi All,

Can anyone with a bounty Hunter style windscreen fitment or Deserter give me a clue how to seal/ bond the glass to the bottom frame (bonnet) and aluminium side posts.
Is there a seal or can a windscreen company bond it?

Cheers
Matt


this user is offline sid

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 13
  • Renegade + Bounty Hunter Corvair
Reply #1 on: April 07, 2021, 11:05:39 PM
bit of a messy job will post some pictures on bottom seal on friday

ally posts use some spacers to make glass central then mask glass and ally bond with tigerseal

hope this helps

david
David


this user is offline Paul1953

  • Buggy Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 2144
  • Newton Aycliffe, Co Durham
  • MANX SWB
Reply #2 on: April 08, 2021, 08:14:46 AM
Polyurethane sealant.....(Tigerseal etc).....  I have talked to a lot of people in the past saying this is such a difficult messy product to use.... It`s not if you follow some simple steps.   Firstly if you attempt to use a tube in a skeleton gun in the outside temps that we have now you are most likely to force the gun push through the tube base.   So warm the tube up thoroughly. Every 10 minutes re-warm the tube.
(I am a camper so, when the missis is looking the other way, I borrow a pan. I heat the tube up in the pan keeping the water hot on a small camping stove).  (I warm the tubes up in summer also). Clean the glass and all other contact areas with acetone or cellulose thinners. (Gel coat will survive a wipe over with thinners. Paint won`t so use acetone).  Use masking tape to create a boundary for the sealant. Only use enough sealant for the job. Sealant will skin over quite soon so the moment all in place remove excess sealant with a clean metal edge. Steel ruler etc. Pull off masking tape quickly pulling it smoothly and away at an angle.    Wear latex gloves. Don`t get any sealant on the gun or it will be all over your gloves and anything you touch. Clean anything off surfaces you may have immediately.

Another thing I am asked is what to do with left over sealant.  Use one of the fingers of a latex glove over the nozzle and "seal" with tape. You may get lucky a few months on and by removing the solidified plug get more use of contents. If not cut off tube and scoop contents out for use.

For anyone just wanting to fit a glass to a frame simply use standard auto grade butyl sealant this is simple to use. Stays flexible and leaves no mess whatsoever. Excess can be cleaned off with a blade. (Was used in all vehicles pre-bonding).


this user is online snoopy

  • MBC Moderator
  • Buggy Fanatic
  • ******
  • Posts: 8855
  • evesham. 07757010432
  • Kango ss/ Jas lwb
Reply #3 on: April 08, 2021, 09:10:48 AM
I used a marine window adhesive to fit the window in the buggy hard top it used a primer paint on the fibreglass first but cannot remember the name and the tube is long gone. Sealant was cheap for the tube but the small pot of primer was silly money.


this user is offline Bealzebug01

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 49
  • Lichfield, Staffs
  • Prowler
Reply #4 on: April 08, 2021, 03:15:55 PM
Thanks guys for all your advice. Really detailed reply thanks Paul. Sid thanks for the photographic offer I look forward to seeing them .

Cheers All


this user is offline sid

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 13
  • Renegade + Bounty Hunter Corvair
Reply #5 on: April 09, 2021, 08:11:18 PM
Hi,

Please see below pictures

When I first offered up the windscreen to fit it was obvious with the aluminium posts that the windscreen is a quarter inch bigger now than when the body was designed 50 years ago. You will see where the post meets the body there is a black 3 to 4mm flat rubber between the posts and the body work. This increased the size of the bonnet by approximately 1/4inch. The aluminium posts at the top was still tight on the glass an extra clearance was made in the aluminium.

To get the glass to fit close to the body all the way round was meaning the windscreen was more vertical than I required, thus I sloped the post backwards to give more of a rake on the windscreen but this left approximately 1/2 inch gap at the bottom of the window to the bodywork in the middle.

See attached link https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/113245997048 this is the windscreen rubber I used and although it was a bit chunky I cut it down approximately 6mm on the width. I did this by clamping the rubber in-between 2 pieces of angle iron and a flat disc on the grinder. It worked very well apart from pieces of rubber went everywhere ;D. The U-section was then lipped under the glass and the rubber just covered the body work gap. Pushing the rubber then all the way along the gap went smaller and eventually the U-section would not go on to the glass. At these points the U-section was then removed and the flat section of the rubber was bonded to the glass and body work to give a professional look. The rubber was also bonded to the bodywork to give a waterproof seal. It was done very carefully and there is no evidence of any bonding on the inside of the dashboard.

Hope you get the idea, take a bit of time and don't rush it and you'll be very please with the result!

David









David


this user is offline sid

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 13
  • Renegade + Bounty Hunter Corvair
Reply #6 on: April 10, 2021, 04:52:50 PM











Hi,

Please see below pictures

When I first offered up the windscreen to fit it was obvious with the aluminium posts that the windscreen is a quarter inch bigger now than when the body was designed 50 years ago. You will see where the post meets the body there is a black 3 to 4mm flat rubber between the posts and the body work. This increased the size of the bonnet by approximately 1/4inch. The aluminium posts at the top was still tight on the glass an extra clearance was made in the aluminium.

To get the glass to fit close to the body all the way round was meaning the windscreen was more vertical than I required, thus I sloped the post backwards to give more of a rake on the windscreen but this left approximately 1/2 inch gap at the bottom of the window to the bodywork in the middle.

See attached link https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/113245997048 this is the windscreen rubber I used and although it was a bit chunky I cut it down approximately 6mm on the width. I did this by clamping the rubber in-between 2 pieces of angle iron and a flat disc on the grinder. It worked very well apart from pieces of rubber went everywhere ;D. The U-section was then lipped under the glass and the rubber just covered the body work gap. Pushing the rubber then all the way along the gap went smaller and eventually the U-section would not go on to the glass. At these points the U-section was then removed and the flat section of the rubber was bonded to the glass and body work to give a professional look. The rubber was also bonded to the bodywork to give a waterproof seal. It was done very carefully and there is no evidence of any bonding on the inside of the dashboard.

Hope you get the idea, take a bit of time and don't rush it and you'll be very please with the result!

David










[/quote]
David


this user is offline sid

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 13
  • Renegade + Bounty Hunter Corvair
Reply #7 on: April 10, 2021, 04:53:09 PM
Hi,

Please see below pictures

When I first offered up the windscreen to fit it was obvious with the aluminium posts that the windscreen is a quarter inch bigger now than when the body was designed 50 years ago. You will see where the post meets the body there is a black 3 to 4mm flat rubber between the posts and the body work. This increased the size of the bonnet by approximately 1/4inch. The aluminium posts at the top was still tight on the glass an extra clearance was made in the aluminium.

To get the glass to fit close to the body all the way round was meaning the windscreen was more vertical than I required, thus I sloped the post backwards to give more of a rake on the windscreen but this left approximately 1/2 inch gap at the bottom of the window to the bodywork in the middle.

See attached link https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/113245997048 this is the windscreen rubber I used and although it was a bit chunky I cut it down approximately 6mm on the width. I did this by clamping the rubber in-between 2 pieces of angle iron and a flat disc on the grinder. It worked very well apart from pieces of rubber went everywhere ;D. The U-section was then lipped under the glass and the rubber just covered the body work gap. Pushing the rubber then all the way along the gap went smaller and eventually the U-section would not go on to the glass. At these points the U-section was then removed and the flat section of the rubber was bonded to the glass and body work to give a professional look. The rubber was also bonded to the bodywork to give a waterproof seal. It was done very carefully and there is no evidence of any bonding on the inside of the dashboard.

Hope you get the idea, take a bit of time and don't rush it and you'll be very please with the result!

David










David


this user is offline Bealzebug01

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 49
  • Lichfield, Staffs
  • Prowler
Reply #8 on: April 10, 2021, 07:54:16 PM
Awesome, thanks for the pics looks really good nice work, and great advise cheers Matt