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December 15, 2019, 07:10:38 PM

GP Mk 1 rebuild

This is a discussion for the topic GP Mk 1 rebuild on the board Members Buggies.

Author Topic: GP Mk 1 rebuild  (Read 917 times)

this user is offline Peter

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Reply #30 on: December 01, 2019, 11:48:47 AM
I am sorry if my post seems a little on the extreme side, its always worth doing some
research though, your bolts may well perform fine.

I have an example that I wanted to pop in, I know its not about wheel bolts but it still holds true, there are
times when I am constantly amazed when it comes to the materials side of our Engineering world.

I made up some drive shafts 25mm (or there abouts) diameter, in their unhardened state they are
pretty soft and would when 800 bhp plus was eventually put through them at launch, just wring themselves apart
like a string of twisting Plasticine, yet after hardening they withstand the force, take the load and propel
the vehicles forward, its quite astonishing to me how on earth such a small diameter can do that.

One other thing is the attention to detail, specially all along the surface of the shafts, there must be no trace
of a machine mark, the slightest scratch, ie a human hair size scratch, will promote stress and the shaft WILL
shear clean in two.

If you ensure your bolts are scratch free and then get them hardened they should be fine, its worth noting that all
wheel retention bolts on our daily drivers have been made from specific grades of material, put through a hardening process
which is necessary to ensure they dont break, coupled up with a manufacturing process that's 'smooth' and doesn't involve 'cutting' in the
normal sense. The result is something thats perfect for the job.

Sooo, you are probably there in this application, just get your machinist to polish them and send them off for hardening.

I do apologise, and am not being picky, its just that the things I do are going out of fashion fast now, I am semi retired
and yet nobody, and I mean nobody is coming into the industry anymore, its not something many do now as they would all
rather work in supermarkets..... Bonkers!

Hopefully all will go ok, and I am sure it will

Regards, Peter  ;-)up
« Last Edit: December 01, 2019, 11:51:10 AM by Peter »
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this user is offline Guy

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Reply #31 on: December 01, 2019, 05:33:02 PM
You are spot on Peter. Engineers are hard to find. I will take all the advice I can get and act on it. It has to be worth having them hardened.  I have a fair working knowledge with respect to engineering but I am by no means a engineer. I appreciate your input  ;-)up


this user is offline Guy

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Reply #32 on: December 01, 2019, 05:34:39 PM
Got the floor pans cut and trimmed to fit today.



this user is online snoopy

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Reply #33 on: December 01, 2019, 05:48:14 PM
Pans look a good fit and nice to know they can be trimmed a bit it may help others.


this user is offline Guy

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Reply #34 on: December 01, 2019, 06:07:58 PM
I’ll put some more pictures up. This is a 15 3/4 inch shortened chassis and they are designed for 14 1/4 to 14 1/2 inch chassis. If you have the latter it is easy. Good quality and the steel is 1.2mm but it is hard compared to the stock pans.


this user is offline Peter

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Reply #35 on: December 01, 2019, 07:16:16 PM
Now they do look nice, I have seen these in adverts but never aligned and in place
on someones chassis. They are just the job  ;-)up

Hopefully they will do well with them
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this user is offline Guy

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Reply #36 on: December 01, 2019, 07:52:24 PM



this user is offline Guy

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Reply #37 on: December 01, 2019, 08:01:05 PM
I hope they do well too. I had to trim my set a lot because the buggy is shorter than a Manx. If you have a Manx or similar 14 1/4 to 14 1/2 inch shortened then these would fit in easily. Just a small trim off the rear edge and a little off the front. I had to loose 50-55mm which was a bit of a challenge but is possible if you trim the lip on the outrigger. I will probably have to seam weld the rear edge from the underside because the lip is not big enough to plug weld.

They are 1.2mm thick and the steel is hard. My cutting disc zipped through the old ones but had a tougher time with these. I would not buy any other floor pans for a buggy.



this user is offline Guy

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Reply #38 on: December 05, 2019, 02:56:13 PM
First few pictures of progress. The floor pans are now in. Plug welded from the top with a stitch weld on the underside. Had to make a panel for the tunnel where it was originally shortened. It should stop any muck building up there as it is now flush.  The FOC pans fit nicely with a especially good fit at the front.


 






I thought this would be a problem but Alan who helped me out got out the big guns. Removed the stuck bolt, drilled it out and helicoiled it. M18 x 1.5......that was on big ass drill.


Fuel tank filler neck relocated


One of the time consuming problems the buggy had was that the revolution wheels had no means to locate on the hubs. They simply relied on the PCD and the lug nuts. As a result the rear drum was machined to accept a spigot which was made on the lathe.






this user is offline Guy

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Reply #39 on: December 05, 2019, 02:58:59 PM
Oh yeah. Removing the lower ball joints.......... ;D the little hand tool.......it took 9T in the press before they moved.


this user is offline Guy

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Reply #40 on: December 05, 2019, 03:18:07 PM
Unused heater slots and tubes removed





Had to put a quick spray of zinc primer on to stop the flash rust


Next steps will be to clean up the gearbox and axle tubes, rebuild the front beam. I will also make it narrower. I am thinking 4 inches but it may cause the tyres to run on the chassis on full lock. Easily solved with a lower profile tyre or maybe I’ll play it safe at 3 inch.


this user is offline Manxdavid

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Reply #41 on: December 05, 2019, 03:54:14 PM
Just wondering why you're thinking of narrowing the beam? I've had tyre to body clearance issues with a stock beam, plus the ride is harsh enough without shortening the torsion leaves.
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this user is offline Guy

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Reply #42 on: December 05, 2019, 04:09:55 PM
Just because the wheels stick out a bit as they are wide. Perhaps it is not worth the aggravation. I did not realise it affected the ride so much



this user is offline Guy

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Reply #43 on: December 05, 2019, 04:12:56 PM
Decision made, beam will stay standard width


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Reply #44 on: December 05, 2019, 05:24:41 PM
standard beam is a good idea as everything works a little softening helps though.