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March 09, 2021, 07:53:32 AM

IVA / SVA Overview

This is a discussion for the topic IVA / SVA Overview on the board Beach Buggy IVA / SVA Help.

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this user is offline DND Services Ltd

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on: August 16, 2017, 10:18:33 PM
Once upon a time in Britain there was a growing industry that provided kits for converting rusting relics into fun and exciting Kit Cars, using GRP body tubs and a whole host of replica and aftermarket fittings and accessories. Building these cars provided enjoyable involvement and spare-time occupation for thousands of people, and driving them around on summer weekends was a fun activity that harmed no-one. Many years ago, there was an attempt to kill that industry stone dead, and it was very nearly successful

Every car built had of course to pass an MOT test, that ensured that it was mechanically safe and met all statutory requirements regarding lighting, seat belt anchorages, structural strength etc. etc. Then in 1998, for no apparent reason at all, the DVLA introduced the 'Single Vehicle Approval' (SVA) test to determine the road worthiness of a vehicle not otherwise type approved within the UK, on a one off basis. This applied to very low volume production vehicles, personally imported cars and Kit Cars. In 2009 the 'Individual Vehicle Approval' (IVA) began replacing the SVA and is now the standard used for the majority of vehicle types previously tested with the SVA test. Standards required are more stringent and test fees are considerably higher.

The tests involve conformity with a host of requirements such as 'minimum radius' edges, type approved steering wheels, etc, etc, and the regulations are being ever futher tightened to bring all those existing kit cars that are 'incorrectly registered' – that is, still retain the base 'donor' car identity – into the net, even if they have been on the road perhaps for years, been taxed and MOT'd etc..

There are many rules that need to be adhered to, but here lies the problem - the IVA rule book is written in the most dreadful format and does not make for sensible reading. But do not fret, because we now have an ever growing number of experts that have successfully been thorugh the IVA process and are here to help and guide you where we can. Together we can, and will, beat them.

 ;-)up

Please keep questions here strictly to IVA / SVA issues, and post any other help questions in the relevant section of the forum.

 8)


this user is offline Paul1953

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Reply #1 on: August 17, 2017, 06:39:54 PM
Dave.... just to say that I could not have put it better than the above statements.

I am waiting quietly in the background to see if the government announces further details of the planned changes to home built, quantity manufactured kits and in particular "heavily modified" production vehicles. The announcements were put on hold as soon as Teresa May stated  she was preparing for a general election and the outcome of the election was known. The plans would seem to be still in abeyance.


this user is offline blarney trouble

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Reply #2 on: December 22, 2017, 04:45:50 PM
Hi Dave. My buggy was built in 86 and has a Q plate, is this different in any way now, i.e desirable, undesirable?
VW...... from the people who bombed your granny


this user is offline Dave DND

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Reply #3 on: December 22, 2017, 06:02:27 PM
Hi Dave. My buggy was built in 86 and has a Q plate, is this different in any way now, i.e desirable, undesirable?

My personal opinion is that Q plates are brilliant - yes, you pay tax, but you are pretty much exempt from any of the crap being thrown around

I reckon its a distinct advantage these days
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this user is offline gasaxe

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Reply #4 on: December 22, 2017, 07:57:21 PM
if you have a Q plate how much is the road tax....??????


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Reply #5 on: December 22, 2017, 08:32:22 PM
Mine is £235 as it is above 1499 cc under that about £175 without checking on DVLA site.


this user is offline Dave DND

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Reply #6 on: January 03, 2018, 11:47:43 PM
Also worth pointing out that not every new Buggy build will require an IVA test. Some of our members have approached this in different ways and hopefully their stories and pointers may be inspirational to you


from  Jim73vw


No problem, I did share my good news and highlight an article I did on this in Complete Kit Car when I received my new log book:

http://www.beachbuggy.info/index.php/topic,6522.msg67940.html#msg67940

though I appreciate not everyone will want to buy a back issue. However - it is a good read, as is the whole magazine, and my article there has nice pictures of the form, supporting evidence sent and how the revised log book looked when returned.

I have extracted the bulk of the article text below - appreciate some comments may be less relevant to buggy readers here, but rather then re-edit I hope this is of benefit. Obviously if the club wants to use the article from the magazine as evidence to DVLA of how the system can be used correctly, and has been applied to LWB variants by their 'Kit and Rebuilds' team I would recommend the full article is sourced and provided. Back issues can be ordered via the Complete Kit Car website, and there is currently stock of this issue - April 2015 Issue 99. http://www.performancepublishing.co.uk/back-issues/page/3/                       

Plug over  ;)

Article body below:

Having completed my beach buggy build the next step was to ensure the vehicle was correctly registered with DVLA. I had chosen the long wheel base Apal shell as I knew this would avoid the need for expensive IVA testing, but still wanted to ensure the vehicle was correctly identified on the log book (V5).
The rise in popularity of kit cars which are re panel/body solutions using a single donor is clear looking over recent issues of this magazine. In all of these cases, even if the primary donor remains mechanically unmodified there will be a need to update the V5. With the increase in use of ANPR (automatic number plate recognition) VOSA, DVLA and the Police can check a vehicle’s identity when on the road. If the vehicle does not match the description on the log book this is sure to raise questions, which are best answered by updating your log book, rather than at the roadside. Such updates may also assist with insurance for your kit and also with future resale values.

With many local DVLA offices having closed in recent times I was not fortunate enough to be able to visit an office to discuss the process so instead turned to the internet where a wealth of material exists.
https://www.gov.uk/change-vehicle-details-registration-certificate
https://www.gov.uk/vehicle-registration
Many club forums also have valuable information on the process, and may offer guidance for your specific kit. If considering a new kit it is also worth discussing this aspect of the build with the manufacturer to understand if they have liaised with DVLA to make relevant changes to log books for their own demonstrators or other customer’s cars.
Reviewing the guides on GOV.uk I could see that my buggy build fell into any one of the following categories, depending on how the guidance is interpreted:
•   Kit converted vehicle
•   Radically altered vehicle
•   Rebuilt vehicle
In each case the instructions are the same – to complete form V627/1 ‘Built Up Vehicle Report’ though the information given with regards to retaining your donor registration number does vary:
Kit Converted Vehicle
According to the supplied definitions a kit-converted vehicle has had:
•   a kit of new parts added to an existing vehicle, or
•   old parts added to a new kit
The general appearance of the vehicle will change because of the kit.
I felt this best applied to my buggy conversion, though my bodyshell was purchased second hand and is a 1970’s kit no longer available. For many of the new kits on the market, such as Ferrari replicas and alike this seems to be the best match. The advice states you may keep a vehicle’s original registration number if you can prove you’ve used 2 original unmodified major parts:
•   chassis (car or light van)
•   monocoque bodyshell (car or light van)
•   frame (motorbike)

Radically altered vehicle
Radically altered vehicles are described as vehicles that have been altered from their original specification, but aren’t kit conversions. Given the age of my bodyshell I was using, and that all other parts were sourced by myself and not from a kit I felt this category may be applied by DVLA. This would also apply to some of the unique one off builds/modifications CKC have featured over the years.
DVLA uses a points system to decide what registration number to give a radically altered vehicle and the requirements are more involved than the Kit-Converted Category. To keep the original registration number your vehicle must score 8 or more points as summarized in the accompanying table. 5 of these points must come from having the original or new and unmodified chassis, monocoque bodyshell or frame.
Part   Points
Chassis, monocoque bodyshell (body and chassis as one unit) or frame - original or new and unmodified (direct from manufacturer)   5
Suspension (front and back) - original   2
Axles (both) - original   2
Transmission - original   2
Steering assembly - original   2
Engine - original   1

DVLA advise you won’t be able to keep your vehicle’s original registration number if one of the following applies:
•   your vehicle scores fewer than 8 points
•   it has a second-hand or altered chassis, monocoque bodyshell or frame
•   there’s evidence that 2 vehicles have been welded together to form one (ie ‘cut and shut’)
If the criteria are not met a Q plate is likely to be applied. Your vehicle must pass the relevant type approval test to get a ‘Q’ prefix registration number.
Considering my buggy build if these criteria were applied I was able to score 13-14 points 11-13 points depending on interpretation. My vehicle has a replacement front axle as the original was corroded. This was a bolt on replacement part, so not a structural alteration. Similarly the donor engine had been replaced, but again with a correct unit from another 1970’s beetle, and of the same size. These were points I wanted to ensure were conveyed when completing the form to avoid any misinterpretation of the changes.
Rebuilt vehicle
Less definition is given on the GOV.uk website regarding what constitutes a rebuilt vehicle, but I felt this category could apply to a rescued kit that we all too often see appear on ebay. As my donor vehicle was bought in a stripped down state I felt it was important to consider this category also. A similar points system is applied for these enabling you to keep a vehicle’s original registration number if you can prove you’ve used:
•   the original unmodified chassis or bodyshell (car or light van)
•   a new chassis or monocoque bodyshell of the same specification as the original (car or light van)
•   the original unmodified frame (motorbike)
•   a new frame of the same specification as the original (motorbike)
You must also have 2 other major components from the original vehicle from the following lists.
For cars or light vans:
•   suspension (front and back)
•   steering assembly
•   axles (both)
•   transmission
•   engine
For motorbikes:
•   forks
•   wheels
•   engine
•   gear box

With these different categories in mind I set to completing form V627/1.
Much of the first page of the form relates to motorcycles or trike conversions, with only 6 rows of the table to complete for the following components if notifying or a car alteration:
Chassis/Bodyshell
Axles (both)
Transmission
Steering assembly
Engine
Suspension (front and back)
For each component you are required to supply a serial number/ID number if available (most likely to apply to any new parts), confirm origin (registration number of donor vehicle), the make of the component and verify if receipts are available. For a simple rebody conversion all rows would most likely confirm a single donor.
In my situation I had to advise of a replacement front axle and replacement engine. It is important to note I transplanted another period correct same capacity engine. As my vehicle was already registered as a historic vehicle (tax exempt) engine changes have less significance. If you are paying road tax on your vehicle a change in engine capacity may lead to the taxation class being revised. For the new parts fitted I also enclosed receipts.
On the rear of the form the following sections need completing:
Original Parts not used – stating how they were disposed of
I had kept a log of all parts bought and sold through my build, and had sold the majority of unwanted donor panels. I supplied a spreadsheet detailing this, as well as receipts for online sales through ebay etc. I advised that the corroded axle was disposed of at my local council recycling centre. If you are selling any parts of your donor I would recommend a similar log and receipts. Also request receipts for any scrap metal sold as this is a particular area of focus currently.
Any other information/Additional documents produced
Here I summarized the build, highlighting the kit shell used was a long wheel base body, and simply a rebody removing the original bodyshell. I stressed here that the core mechanical components remain as per a standard VW beetle and reconfirmed all of the original parts retained. This section also asks you to verify the year/s of the build and who completed the build. If you have outsourced to a professional builder receipts will be required.
Additional notes or comments
This section is provided for any other background information that is relevant. I used this to explain the origins of the replacement parts, stressing they were like for like OEM style replacements. I also referred to my build diary which formed the CKC Running Reports. As I didn’t have a manufacturers receipt for my bodyshell I confirmed the age and name of the buggy shell.
For a simple rebody this form accompanied with relevant receipts should be more than sufficient to convey all required information. In my case I chose to send a covering letter with the form which summarized the additional information provided. In my case I provided the following:
1.   Running Report Articles from Complete Kit Car (18 in total)
(useful to show in picture form that the base chassis is not altered)
2.   Receipt for purchase of donor beetle
3.   Receipt for purchase of Apal buggy shell
4.   Spreadsheet detailing the items sold from the original beetle
5.   Receipt for sale of original bodyshell
6.   Extract from the Dune Buggy Handbook confirming Apal shell details
(used as no manufacturer information available for kit – if fitting a new kit supplier specifications/instructions would suffice)
7.   Article from Belgium Apal website confirming Apal shell details
8.   (used as no manufacturer information available for kit – if fitting a new kit supplier specifications/instructions would suffice)
9.   Receipt for replacement beetle front axle (original version corroded)
10.   Summary of engine codes for VW beetles to validate previous replacement engine code

I then sent off this information and waited for news from DVLA. It is important to note that correspondence of this type should be sent to K&R (Kit and Rebuilds),DVLA
SA99 1ZZ

In my case after a fortnight I received a new log book back with my vehicle details updated. This included a statement on the front page, Section 3 stating ‘Rebuilt – assembled from parts some of which or all were not new’. This is a permanent note on the log book which cannot be removed, and rightly informs future purchasers of the car’s origins.

The vehicle make (previously Volkswagen Beetle) was also changed to read ‘Volkswagen Buggy’. I was not required to present the vehicle for inspection though the DVLA do advise that changes to any of the following may warrant an inspection:
•   wheel plan
•   body type (DVLA give a body type description based on the vehicle’s external appearance)
•   vehicle identification number (VIN)
•   chassis number
•   frame number for motorbikes
•   
Whilst I didn’t receive any written feedback on the information provided my opinion is that by providing as much information as possible relevant to your build you will increase your chances of a routine V5 update and avoid the need for formal inspection. That said I have spoken to other Long Wheel Base Buggy builders who have presented their buggy for a brief inspection following submission of V627/1 resulting in the issuing of a revised V5. I hope this guide is useful to anyone contemplating a similar style build, and reassures that these changes can be made painlessly if organised with your build diary.

Hope this helps,

All the best,

Jim

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this user is offline Dave DND

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Reply #7 on: January 04, 2018, 12:08:43 PM
Chris Jordan also has some detailed help with regards to what parameters DVLA use for a conversion, because it could open the doors for those wanting to rebody a Beetle as a kit without being worried by IVA

Have a look at the details and PDF's on his web site regarding how he registered his Doon in 2005.

http://www.chris-jordan.org.uk/registering-the-long-wheel-base-doon-in-2005.html

 ;-)up
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this user is offline Paul1953

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Reply #8 on: January 04, 2018, 12:44:24 PM
Whilst I didn’t receive any written feedback on the information provided my opinion is that by providing as much information as possible relevant to your build you will increase your chances of a routine V5 update and avoid the need for formal inspection. That said I have spoken to other Long Wheel Base Buggy builders who have presented their buggy for a brief inspection following submission of V627/1 resulting in the issuing of a revised V5. I hope this guide is useful to anyone contemplating a similar style build, and reassures that these changes can be made painlessly if organised with your build diary.


Jim... Well done with this post.. Been down this route in the past myself...... You spent the time to type all this up and post it. I would like to comment on the paragraph above because there is never going to be a time when DVSA, (DVLA), have a system that is manned by individuals "programmed in their head" to deal with every application in exactly the same manner so the more info you give the easier your journey has to be.

Now then to anyone contemplating a long wheel base conversion of a Beetle read Jim`s post through thoroughly. It really isn`t "over the top" at all.
I too have spoken to others who have not gone to the detail Jim`s application shows and had a V5C updated "eventually" but the word "eventually" is the operative one.

The inspection, if you have to have one, and this is no longer imperative for each and every one, is not very different to an MOT inspection but the DVSA appointed engineer`s word is final.

Why is what Jim states really important in my view.... Well can I use the IVA examination as an example of DVSA "ruling the roost" with regard to the issue of re-registration, document update etc. (I posted very early on when I joined the forum that for IVA keep every single piece of paper relating to parts purchase etc.... not for IVA but for DVSA). Wouldn`t you think that after a 4 to 5 hour extreme examination by VOSA and receiving a "pass" and being issued with the ACT certificate you would be "home & dry"... Your vehicle has passed the checks and has been pronounced fit for use on the road in any EU country. Surely off goes your certificate plus the application form plus the fee to DVSA and back comes your registration number and approval to obtain legitimate number plates. Surely all they need to do is record the ACT certificate. Do their check with Interpol to see the original Beetle is not recorded stolen etc, (Yes I do mean Interpol).

Not so.. they require all that Jim states. There are examples of amateur build vehicle owners waiting up to 17 weeks to complete this process as DVSA asks for document after document. (Times are changing).

So forget IVA..... But if going to the extent Jim has covers all DVSA can possibly think to ask you for and you get your amendment\s done and no check required on a long wheel base build it all makes sense to me.

All the best Paul :D :D

Nope.... You need the mountains of paperwork etc.


this user is online snoopy

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Reply #9 on: January 04, 2018, 02:10:32 PM
Hopefully when all this is sorted there will be a DVLA required documentation list for lwb V5 changes then builders will have a set route to follow rather than the hit and miss we have now.

The new build swb route is already set with IVA compliance.


this user is offline blarney trouble

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Reply #10 on: February 08, 2018, 11:37:32 AM
Hi Dave and thanks for your reply to my original question.
I am thinking of selling my buggy as I just don't get the time anymore, too many other money pit projects.
The log book states.... make - Californian, body type - convertible, 1986 on a Q plate. nowhere does it mention VW or saloon.
What I'm asking is- does this make it more desirable for potential builders of buggies or kit cars and therefore more valuable? ;) ;)
VW...... from the people who bombed your granny


this user is offline Oojamaflip

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Reply #11 on: February 08, 2018, 04:28:41 PM
Hi Dave and thanks for your reply to my original question.
I am thinking of selling my buggy as I just don't get the time anymore, too many other money pit projects.
The log book states.... make - Californian, body type - convertible, 1986 on a Q plate. nowhere does it mention VW or saloon.
What I'm asking is- does this make it more desirable for potential builders of buggies or kit cars and therefore more valuable? ;) ;)

It does to certain people I found out as a Q is technically a blank canvas so can be anything as long as convertible however unsure about yours as make is Californian also draw back is you pay tax I too have a 1986 orange Q plate Californian however is make vw convertible
Apparently I'm having a mid-life crisis....Lasted 30 years thus far.

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this user is online Manxdavid

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Reply #12 on: February 08, 2018, 04:48:41 PM
Awkward one really as Californian was never a make of buggy, it was a model of kit made by Limited Edition Sports Cars Ltd. Another DVLA anomaly. :-\
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"Ah, Beach Buggies, sure, just a quick cheap way of getting a few more years out of a rusty Beetle. You can throw one together in a weekend." anon.


this user is offline Dave DND

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Reply #13 on: February 08, 2018, 05:04:11 PM
The way I see it is this . .

It does not personally matter to me what my Buggy is called on paper.

DVLA are incapable of correctly naming a Buggy on paper.

So . .  The only people that are really bothered by what it says on paper are the Feds by the roadside with a camera, or following you with ANPR. 

If the vehicle that they are following is unusual (ie: a Buggy) and the ANPR request comes back with something unusual (GP / Sidewinder / Buggy / Californian) - then that is considered to be a match and they will probably leave you alone.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2021, 07:56:58 AM by Dave DND »
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Reply #14 on: February 08, 2018, 07:53:06 PM
The way I see it is this . .

It does not personally matter to me what my Buggy is called on paper.

DVLA are incapable of correctly naming a Buggy on paper.

So . .  The only people that are really bothered by what it says on paper are the Feds by the roadside with a camera, or following you with ANPR. 

If the vehicle that they are following is unusual (ie: a Buggy) and the ANPR request comes back with something unusual (GP / Sidewinder / Buggy / Californian) - then that is considered to be a match and they will probably leave you alone.
My thoughts entirely a specific body name is fine on any shell it just says it is something different from a beetle
« Last Edit: January 21, 2021, 07:57:19 AM by Dave DND »